Secondary Source Analysis #3

For Secondary Source Analysis #3, you will be examining the footnotes of the article.  You will identify the different types of sources used in the article.  In order to accomplish this task, you will survey the footnotes and submit an assignment consistent with the example in Secondary Source Analysis #3 – Sample Answer.   You will know the correct #1 and #2 answers, so be sure to fix them for your #3 submission; don’t just submit your #3 with your old #1 and #2 answers, or you will lose points.
What to submit: A listing of the types of sources used in the article formatted as described in the sample answer.
How it will be graded:  The footnote number and type of sources will each represent 50% of the 90 points; the fixed #2 is worth 10 points.
How many points for the assignment: 100 points
When is it due:  By 11:59pm on the due date; see the Critical Dates in the Syllabus, or look in this week’s module.

Introduction
The final task in reading a history journal article is thinking about the sources used.  Examining the sources begins with determining what kinds of sources were used, and that will be our focus:  identifying the different types of sources used by the author as the information and evidence.  To accomplish this task, we will simply walk through the article’s footnotes and identify each type of source as it shows up for the first time.  We only need to identify a type of source once when it first shows up, and then after that we can safely ignore that type of source.
Identifying the Sources
It is important to realize that this explanation will take much longer than doing this assignment on your own.  Reading through this analysis and understanding how to identify each type of source will make doing this work much easier the next time, i.e. for your article.  Typically the types of sources are less dense as you move through the article because for more and more footnotes, you have already identified all the types present.  For each footnote, I’m going to explain what is there, and how to determine what type of source(s) are present.
Footnote 1: There is one source here, a memo from FDR to a general, and the memo is in a report.  You can tell it is a memo from the “from FDR to general” beginning of the footnote.  The title of the report is in italics.  Since this is something produced by the government, it would be a government document; additionally, because it is about the WPA, this source is WPA documents.  From this point on, any WPA documents can be ignored for the assignment.  So, for the assignment, Footnote 1: WPA documents.
Footnote 2: There are two sources here, and they are both books.  One is by Edwin Amenta and the title is italics; the information in parenthesis is the publication info.  The other source is by Jason Scott Smith (yes, the author of the article) and the title / publication information are present in the same way as Amenta’s book.  Any book is going to look like these two sources, so from this point forward, you should be able to identify a source as a book, and you can ignore all future books in the footnotes as sources for the assignment.  So, for the assignment, Footnote 2: Books.
Footnote 3: There is one source here, and it is a government document.  It is a memo that is part of the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Records.  They are stored at the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley.  Reel 22 tells you it is from a microfilm collection.  So, for the assignment, Footnote 3: Government documents.
Footnote 4: There are seven sources in this note, and it is common for some of the early notes in an article to have many sources listed.  Despite the larger number of sources, there are only two kinds of sources here: journal articles and books.  A journal article is from a peer-reviewed (other professionals have looked it over and agree it meets the standards of the profession) journal; in this case there are two.  Both are from the Journal of American History, which is the journal title in italics.  The author name is first, followed by the article’s title in quotation marks, followed by the journal’s name in italics, ending with the volume and/or number, year, and page(s).  The first article is by Jacobs, and the second by Leff.  All of the remaining sources in this footnote are books.  The final book is an edited collection, which is why after the name Gerstle you see “eds.” for editors; but it is still a book.  So for the assignment, Footnote 4: Journal article.
Footnote 5: This footnote has an article first, and then seven books.  Nothing new here, so we move on to the next footnote.
Footnote 6: Here we have a paper presented at a meeting; this is a lot like a journal article before it is published.  So, for the assignment, Footnote 6: Meeting Paper.
Footnote 7: An article and two books; nothing new.
Footnote 8: The “US Army: Final Report” is a type of government document, specifically a government report.  For our purposes, we will stick with government document, which we already have.  The other sources are books, so nothing new.
Footnote 9: Four sources here.  Book, book, journal article, and journal article.  Nothing new.
Footnote 10: Three sources: book, book, and article; nothing new.
Footnote 11: Multiple articles all in the same issue of the same journal; nothing new.
Footnote 12: Six sources: four books, one government document, and something new!  The last source is a PhD dissertation.  So, for the assignment, Footnote 12: PhD Dissertation.  As a side note, the first book is Brinkley, The End of Reform.  This is a shortened reference to the book, and is used once a book has been cited the first time; every time after that first, time, the author’s last name and shorter version of the full title, along with a page number, is used to refer to the source.  Shortened references are common as you move through an article, and the footnotes toward the end will have more shortened citations.  By the way, the government document is the source right before the dissertation.
Footnote 13: Seven sources, all books; nothing new.
Footnote 14: Four sources, all books.  The third source looks kind of like a journal article, but it is actually a chapter in a book; you can tell because there are editors and the title / publication information matches a book rather than a journal article.  So, nothing new here.
Footnote 15: Two sources here.  The second one is a book.  The first one is a memo from Hopkins (close advisor to the president, right?) to President Roosevelt.  The memo is part of the presidential papers at the FDR presidential library.  Thus, this is a government document, but it is a special type of government document.  So, for the assignment, Footnote 15: Presidential Papers.
Footnote 16:  One source, a specialized encyclopedia.  Typically historians don’t use encyclopedias, but specialized ones are an occasional exception.  So, for the assignment, Footnote 16: Encyclopedia
Footnote 17:  Two sources: a book and a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 18:  One source: a book; nothing new
Footnote 19:  Two sources: a book and a government document, so nothing new.]
Footnote 20:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 21:  Two sources: the encyclopedia we saw before, and something new!  This other source is a newspaper article; the name in italics is a well-know newspaper, and contains the date and page number.  So, for the assignment, Footnote 21: Newspaper.
Footnote 22:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 23:  One source: a book, so nothing new.
Footnote 24:  One source: a book, so nothing new.
Footnote 25:  One source, and it is new!  This is an article from a magazine.  This type of article is different from a journal article.  A journal article is by a historian or other academic type of person, and is reviewed by other historians/academics before publication; a magazine article is written by anyone, and it isn’t reviewed by any peers.  Magazines are also designed to be read by the general population, and peer-reviewed journals are designed to be read by fellow academics and students.  So, for the assignment, Footnote: 25: Magazine Article.
Footnote 26:  Another new source!  There is only one in this footnote, but it is an oral history interview, published in a book of oral history interviews.  Thus, while in one sense it is a book, the more important aspect for us is the oral history.  So, for the assignment: Footnote 26: Oral History Interview.
Footnote 27:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 28:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 29:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 30:  Two sources: these are from the same collection of sources as the three government documents in footnotes 27-29, but they are both from a newspaper, so nothing new.
Footnote 31:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 32:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 33:  Two sources: a government document and a book, so nothing new.
Footnote 34:  One source: a book, so nothing new.
Footnote 35:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 36:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 37:  Three sources: a government document and two books.  The government document is the same as the one in the footnote right above it, #36, and that notation is sometimes referred to using the Latin term “Ibid”, short for “Ibidem,” which means “in the same place.”  So, nothing new.
Footnote 38:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 39:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 40:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 41:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 42:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 43:  One source: a government document (see footnote 12), so nothing new.
Footnote 44:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 45:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 46:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 47:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 48:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 49:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 50:  Three sources: two books and something new!  We have a Senate committee hearing.  This is a special type of government document, so for the assignment, Footnote 50: Congressional Records.
Footnote 51:  One source: congressional records, so nothing new.
Footnote 52:  Three sources:  congressional records and two books, so nothing new.
Footnote 53:  One source: congressional records, so nothing new.
Footnote 54:  One source: congressional records, so nothing new.
Footnote 55:  One source: congressional records, so nothing new.
Footnote 56:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 57:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 58:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 59:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 60:  One source: while this footnote says it is an interview, but it is from a collection of documents gathered by the government (see footnote 3 for the original reference to the collection).  There are a couple of similar examples in the remaining footnotes, so for the assignment, a government document, and thus nothing new.
Footnote 61:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 62:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 63:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 64:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 65:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 66:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 67:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 68:  One source: a government document, so nothing new.
Footnote 69:  Three sources: all books, so nothing new.
Footnote 70:  One source: this is similar to what we found in footnote 60.  This is a newspaper article, but found in a government document collection.  So, for the assignment, a government document and thus nothing new.  (Even if it was classified as a newspaper, it still would be nothing new.
Footnote 71:  Two sources: a newspaper article and the encyclopedia we saw before.  So, nothing new.
Footnote 72:  One source: a newspaper, so nothing new.
Footnote 73:  One source: a newspaper, so nothing new.
Footnote 74:  Two sources: a government document, and a reference to that document in a book.  This is kind of technically one source, but it shows how a source can show up in more than one place.
Footnote 75:  Two sources:  books, so nothing new.
Footnote 76:  Cites footnote 10, so nothing new.
Footnote 77:  Two sources: books, so nothing new.
Footnote 78:  One source: a book, so nothing new.
And we are done!

For Secondary Source Analysis #3, you will be examining the footnotes of the article.  You will identify the different types of sources used in the article.  In order to accomplish this task, you will survey the footnotes and submit an assignment consistent with the example in Secondary Source Analysis #3 – Sample Answer.   You will know the correct #1 and #2 answers, so be sure to fix them for your #3 submission; don’t just submit your #3 with your old #1 and #2 answers, or you will lose points.

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